Syllabus

Instructor Information

Barbara Schroeder, Ed.D.

Office E326

Gmail chat boisebarbara@gmail.com

Phone/SMS 208-856-0582

Twitter @boisesbarbara

Skype boisebarbara

Email boisebarbara@gmail.com

Office Hours By appointment

Adobe Connect Meeting Room http://edtech.acrobat.com/barbara

Course News EDTECH 501 News Forum (RSS enabled)


Teaching Philosophy

I believe that:

  1. All students can become lifelong learners.
  2. Significant learning requires commitment and time.
  3. Struggle is a necessary and important part of learning.
  4. Learners must be responsible for their learning.
  5. Teachers should never do for students what they can do for themselves.formation

Course Information

Title of course: EDTECH 501: Introduction to Educational Technology

Semester: Summer 2012

Credits: 3 graduate

Prerequisites

You should be able to perform the following:

  1. Identify and locate specific URLs
  2. Conduct basic Internet research
  3. Create and save files in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint
  4. Create and save documents in Google Docs
  5. Download and install programs
  6. Update operating system software and other software tools
  7. Use a digital camera, microphone, and webcam
  8. Send and receive emails and attachments
  9. Communicate with various online tools, such as Gmail chat and Skype
  10. Post and reply to discussion forums

Moodle site: http://edtech.mrooms.org

Welcome from your instructor

I would like to welcome you to EDTECH 501, the introductory course in our EDTECH degree program. In this course, you will learn how to become actively involved in our EDTECH program, network with colleagues and professionals, and immerse yourself in the exciting world of educational technology.

This is an online, asynchronous course, which means you can “attend” class during your free hours, allowing you flexibility in your learning. The only required class “meeting” will be an online web meeting during the first week, where you will introduce yourself and meet your instructor and classmates.

This syllabus is a very important document, serving as a contract between you and your instructor. It provides detailed information on what you will achieve in this course and how you will get there.

I look forward to meeting you during our first web meeting and learning with you during this semester.

Course format

This course is learner-centered, meaning that learning is active and requires participation from all students.

Research on learner-centered teaching indicates that it helps students learn more and understand better (Felder & Brent, 1996). Teaching is not something that can only be done by a professor. Students need to be involved and participate in the process. Therefore, this course may be different from previous courses you have taken.

Additionally, in a learner-centered course, you will develop skills you can use in your current or future careers. Prospective employers prefer people who know how to take responsibility for their learning.

Your cooperation and support in this style of teaching and learning is essential to its success. If you adopt an active learning mode, taking responsibility for your own learning and providing helpful feedback to your classmates, you will help build a positive and sustainable environment for learning.

Reference:

Felder, R. M., & Brent, R. (1996). Navigating the bumpy road to student-centered instruction. College Teaching, 44(2), 43–47.

Catalog description

Overview of the field of educational technology emphasizing current issues, leadership in technology use planning, and evaluation/synthesis of research.

Learning outcomes

In this course, you will

  1. identify resources for professional growth and development in the field of educational technology;
  2. summarize your goals and expectations in this program;
  3. design and organize an EDTECH Learning Log;
  4. synthesize research in educational technology;
  5. analyze issues and outline solutions to a digital inequality scenario;
  6. identify and apply trends in educational technology;
  7. compose an overview of technology use planning; and
  8. evaluate your school’s current technology environment.

Tips on succeeding in this course

  1. Read the syllabus and understand how you will be assessed in this course. Ask for clarifications as needed.
  2. Attend the first week’s web meeting and add your instructor to your Gmail contact list.
  3. Use our course discussion forums to post questions instead of sending your instructor an email.
  4. Use Gmail chat or Moodle messaging for quick and immediate answers to questions.
  5. Login to the course often and stay on top of discussion forums and communication.
  6. Give yourself enough time to work on assignments—don’t wait until the weekend to begin working on a weekly assignment.
  7. Contact your instructor IMMEDIATELY if you need help or find yourself getting behind.
  8. Be impeccable in your writing and research—understand what constitutes plagiarism.
  9. Expect to struggle and spend time in learning.

Course Schedule

Your instructor has designed this course to accommodate student needs and differentiate instruction, respecting your schedule and technology skills. Thus, you will have the ability to either follow the recommended course schedule or work ahead, accessing future modules/weeks when you have completed the requirements.

You can view the completion requirements at the beginning of each week.

Most of the activities and assignments have requirements (such as posting to forums) before the assignment will be marked completed (a check mark to the right). Some of the resources simply require viewing for completion (such as the Course Syllabus.)

You will need to work with your small group, however, on the Digital Inequality Assignment, and also return to discussion forums to read, respond to, and rate your classmates’ (minimum of 5) or small group posts.

I hope this will help in your planning for the course and even allow you to finish early if desired!


Module1: Learning Networks

Week 1: June 4 – 10

Small Group Selection: Monday, June 4
Web Meeting Choice: Tuesday, June 5
Diigo discussion forum: Wednesday, June 6
Adobe Connect Web Meeting: June 6, 7, or 8
Introduce Yourself Video: Sunday June 10

Week 2: June 11 – 17

Introduce Yourself: Small Groups: Sunday, June 17
Learning Log Assignment: Sunday, June 17

Module 2: EDTECH Research

Week 3: June 18 – 24

RSS Feeds Assignment: Sunday, June 24

Week 4: June 25 – July 1

Zotero Library Assignment: Sunday, July 1

Module 3: Ethical Issues in Educational Technology

Week 5: July 2 – 8

Digital Inequality Assignment: Sunday, July 8

Module 4: Technology Trends

Week 6: July 9 – 15

Tech Trends Assignment: Sunday, July 15

Module 5: Technology Use Planning

Week 7: July 16 – 22

Technology Use Planning Overview: Wednesday, July 18

Week 8: July 23 – 29

School Evaluation Summary: Sunday, July 29

Module 6: Wrap-Up!

Bumper Sticker: Sunday, July 29
Final Course Evaluation Quiz: Sunday, July 29


Materials

Recommended book

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition

By American Psychological Association
Pages: 272
Item #: 4200068
ISBN: 978-1-4338-0562-2
Publication Date: July 2009
Format: Spiral Bound

Software/Hardware

You will need a computer with speakers and constant Internet access. High speed Internet access yields the best results in this class.

A microphone will be required for this course for narrating presentations and attending optional web meetings. For web conferencing, a headset is recommended. To record presentations, you can often use an internal microphone with good results. A webcam is also strongly recommended.


Course Policies

Logging in to course

This is an asynchronous, online course. Should you plan on traveling during the semester, make sure you will have access to the Internet to complete assignments.

You should get in the habit of logging in to our course site at least once a day, to check on any news postings, new student posts, and other course additions.

Faculty initiated drop

Please be advised that if you do not login to this course at least once during the first week, you will be dropped from class.

Participation in discussions

This class requires posting to discussion forums, composing replies, and rating your classmates’ work based upon an instructor-created rubric.

It is essential you apply criticism and comments effectively and with compassion. You will need to post replies that include the positive as well as ways your classmates might improve their work.

Remember, writing can easily be misinterpreted. Make sure you post appropriately and with empathy to all course communications. Follow standard rules of polite online behavior or netiquette at all times.

Student Code of Conduct

For this course, we will be adhering to the Boise State Student Code of Conduct: http://osrr.boisestate.edu/scp-codeofconduct/

Please review this code so that you understand your rights and responsibilities.

Academic integrity

According to the BSU Student Code of Conduct: “Cheating or plagiarism in any form is unacceptable. The University functions to promote the cognitive and psychosocial development of all students. Therefore, all work submitted by a student must represent her/his own ideas, concepts, and current understanding. Academic dishonesty also includes submitting substantial portions of the same academic course work to more than one course for credit without prior permission of the instructor(s).”

For this course, plagiarism will apply to three categories: Cheating, Non-attribution, and Patchwriting:

  1. Cheating: Borrowing, purchasing, or obtaining work composed by someone else and submitting it under one’s own name. The minimum penalty is an “F” in the course; the maximum penalty, suspension from the university.
  2. Non-attributions: Failing to cite passages or ideas from the work of another. First-time offense is review of source attribution and revision of the paper. Continued non-attribution in work will result in an “F” in the course and possible suspension from the university.
  3. Patchwriting: Writing passages that are not copied exactly, but have been borrowed from another source. First offense: review and revision of assignment. Continued patchwriting will result in an “F in the course and possible suspension from the university.

Important Note: Both citation and quotation marks are required whenever you copy exact words and phrases from a source. When you paraphrase or summarize but do not copy exactly, citation is still required. When in doubt, cite. Over-citation is an error, but under-citation is plagiarism. Your citations should follow APA style, 6th edition.

Confidentiality and privacy statement

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. To read about these rights, please go to http://registrar.boisestate.ed…lity.shtml


Assignments, Assessment, & Evaluation

Grading criteria

Each assignment is worth a certain number of points. The total points received for all assignments are divided by the total number of course points, resulting in a course percentage score.

Below is a list of all assignments for this course, with their respective points:

  1. Introduce Yourself Video (50 points)
  2. Learning Log Assignment (20 points)
  3. Zotero Library Assignment (20 points)
  4. Digital Inequality Assignment (100 points)
  5. Tech Trends Assignment (100 points)
  6. RSS Feeds Assignment (20 points)
  7. Technology Use Planning Overview (50 points)
  8. School Evaluation Summary (100 points)
  9. Bumper Sticker (40 points)
  10. Final Course Evaluation Quiz (20 extra credit points)

Course Total Points: 500

Letter Scores
500 – 450 points (100 – 90%) = A
449 – 400 points (89 – 80%) = B
399 – 350 points (79 – 70%) = C
398 – 300 points (69 – 60%) = D
< 300 points (<60%) = F

Accessing your grades

You can check your progress in Moodle by clicking the Grades link in the Course settings block. Progress is updated as assignments are evaluated throughout the semester.

Types of assignments

One assignment is completed with your small group, the Digital Inequality Assignment. The remainder of the assignments are completed on your own.

Due dates

Due dates are clearly stated in this syllabus and in the assignment descriptions. You should make sure you submit assignments by the due date, by midnight Mountain Time.

Writing styles

All writing should be formatted according to APA, 6thedition.

Re-writes

You are always encouraged to revise an assignment. The purpose of this class is to help you learn.

Policy on late assignments

You are allowed ONE LATE ASSIGNMENT.

Boise State Incomplete Policy

Instructors can enter a grade of I — for incomplete — if both of the following conditions are present:

  1. Your work has been satisfactory up to the last three weeks of the semester.
  2. Extenuating circumstances make it impossible for you to complete the course before the end of the semester.

In order to receive an incomplete, you and your instructor must agree to a contract stipulating the work you must do and the time in which it must be completed for you to receive a grade in the class. The terms of this contract are viewable on BroncoWeb under Your Student Center To Do List. The contract time may not exceed one year. If no grade other than incomplete has been assigned one year after the original incomplete, the grade of F will automatically be assigned. The grade of F may not be changed without approval of the University Appeals Committee. You may not remove the incomplete from your transcript by re-enrolling in the class during another semester. A grade of incomplete is excluded from GPA calculations until you receive a final grade in the course.


Student Support Services

Disability services/Accommodation policies

To request academic accommodations for a disability, contact the Office of Disability Services, Admin 114, (208) 426-1583. Students are required to provide documentation of their disability and meet with a Disability Specialist prior to receiving accommodations. Information about a disability or health condition will be regarded as confidential.

Writing support

Boise State maintains a Writing Center, which is an excellent resource to help you in proofreading and improving your writing. You may submit writing through email and receive support. For more information, go to the Writing Center website: http://writingcenter.boisestate.edu/email/

Research support

Boise State’s Albertsons Library is another excellent resource. We have a designated librarian who helps our EDTECH students. For more information, go to our EDTECH Library Guides:http://guides.boisestate.edu/edtech

APA style resources

There are many helpful online resources, should you have trouble learning how to use and apply APA formatting. An excellent online resource is the Purdue OWL guide:http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Counseling/Consultation

Please feel free to contact any of our excellent EDTECH support staff for counseling and other support services:

Student Outreach Coordinator: Kellie Branson (kelliebranson@boisestate.edu)

Admissions Advisor: Dixie Conner (dixieconner@boisestate.edu)

Academic Advising: Paul Castelin (paulcastelin@boisestate.edu)

Moodle Support: moodlesupport@boisestate.edu

EDTECH Library Support: Margie Ruppel (margieruppel@boisestate.edu)

EDTECH Department Chair: Dr. Kerry Rice (krice@boisestate.edu)

EDTECH Website

http://edtech.boisestate.edu


Instructional Emphasis

Peer reviews, sharing

This course may be different from what you are accustomed. One of its strengths (and challenges) is that you will be required to view and rate most of your classmates’ assignments, using instructor-created rubrics. Your ratings will be anonymous. However, you should post replies to your classmates’ posts, too, providing more information, such as missing elements, incorrect grammar, or other issues. And, of course, you should also comment on what they did very well.

The interactive and cooperative discussion forums should strengthen and promote class community, while also providing you with a way to self-assess your progress.

In order to facilitate this process, you will be required to review and rate at least 5 of your classmates’ submissions. That way, you will not be overwhelmed with grading classmates’ work, but will have enough work to view and compare to your own.


Other Useful Information

Study time expected

Plan to spend anywhere from 8 – 15 hours during the regular semester or 16 – 30 hours during summer session on this class, depending upon your skill level. It is in your best interest to start early on each assignment, to give yourself time to fix technical issues or get help before a due date passes.

Withdrawal dates

Please be aware of all deadlines and dates contained in the BSU Academic Calendar, which can be accessed through BroncoWeb (http://broncoweb.boisestate.edu)

Grade disputes

If you feel your grade is lower than you expected, you are welcome to dispute it. To do this, please send an email to your instructor, along with the assignment grade in question and a detailed argument supporting your request for a grade re-evaluation. Your instructor will take this into consideration and will respond to your request.


AECT Standards (SMETS)

Throughout this course, you will be creating artifacts that align with various AECT Standards (Standards for the Accreditation of School Media Specialist and Educational Technology Programs or SMETS). You will be linking to or embedding these artifacts through posts on your EDTECH Learning Log. You will assign a category or categories (AECT Standards) to each post, in order to organize your work throughout the EDTECH program. Categories will enable you to easily locate the artifacts assigned to AECT Standards.

Please refer to the AECT Standards (PDF) document for more detailed information. This will help you identify how and why your artifacts created in the program align with the Standards.

STANDARD 2: DEVELOPMENT
Candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to develop instructional materials and experiences using print, audiovisual, computer-based, and integrated technologies.

2.4 Integrated Technologies
Integrated technologies are ways to produce and deliver materials which encompass several forms of media under the control of a computer.

STANDARD 3: UTILIZATION
Candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to use processes and resources for learning by applying principles and theories of media utilization, diffusion, implementation, and policy-making.

3.1 Media Utilization 
Media utilization is the systematic use of resources for learning.

3.2 Diffusion of Innovations 
Diffusion of innovations is the process of communicating through planned strategies for the purpose of gaining adoption.

3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization 
Implementation is using instructional materials or strategies in real (not simulated) settings. Institutionalization is the continuing, routine use of the instructional innovation in the structure and culture of an organization.

3.4 Policies and Regulations 
Policies and regulations are the rules and actions of society (or its surrogates) that affect the diffusion and use of Instructional Technology.

STANDARD 4: MANAGEMENT
Candidates demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions to plan, organize, coordinate, and supervise instructional technology by applying principles of project, resource, delivery system, and information management.

4.1 Project Management 
Project management involves planning, monitoring, and controlling instructional design and development projects.

4.2 Resource Management 
Resource management involves planning, monitoring, and controlling resource support systems and services.

STANDARD 5: EVALUATION
Candidates demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions to evaluate the adequacy of instruction and learning by applying principles of problem analysis, criterion-referenced measurement, formative and summative evaluation, and long-range planning.

5.1 Problem Analysis

Problem analysis involves determining the nature and parameters of the problem by using information-gathering and decision-making strategies.

5.3 Formative and Summative Evaluation 
Formative evaluation involves gathering information on adequacy and using this information as a basis for further development. Summative evaluation involves gathering information on adequacy and using this information to make decisions about utilization.

5.4 Long-Range Planning 
Long-range planning that focuses on the organization as a whole is strategic planning….Long-range is usually defined as a future period of about three to five years or longer. During strategic planning, managers are trying to decide in the present what must be done to ensure organizational success in the future.


Subject to change notice

The instructor reserves the right to change this syllabus. You will be notified of any changes immediately through the EDTECH 501 News Forum.

Last modified: Thursday, May 24, 2012, 11:29 AM
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s